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“Detroit” struggles to find the right tone

“DETROIT” is not the first feature that Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal have collaborated on, nor is it the first they have adapted from an explosive true story. “The Hurt Locker” (2008) was based on Mr Boal’s time as a journalist embedded in an American Explosive Ordnance Disposal team in …

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The coming sixth extinction

Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature Is Thriving in an Age of Extinction. By Chris Thomas. Allen Lane; 320 pages; £20. To be published in America in September by PublicAffairs; $28. The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions. By …

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Fiona Mozley is a rising star of British fiction

Young and gifted Elmet. By Fiona Mozley. John Murray; 310 pages; £10.99. “DADDY and Cathy and I lived in a small house that Daddy built with materials from the land here about.” From this apparently simple premise, Fiona Mozley (pictured) unfurls a dark and delicate fairy-tale of contemporary Britain that …

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The complex linguistic universe of “Game of Thrones”

WINNING 38 Emmy awards is a good measure of success. “Game of Thrones” garnered that many for its portrayal of a world of sex, violence and politics. Westeros and Essos seem so real that some viewers could imagine moving there. Part of that detail has been the creation of the …

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Modern American elites have come to favour inconspicuous consumption

Keeping cool in LA The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class. By Elizabeth Currid-Halkett. Princeton University Press; 254 pages; $29.95 and £24.95. STATUS symbols are as old as humanity itself. It was only once ancient Rome became rich enough for plebeians to decorate their homes that …

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Sam Shepard’s terrifying, hilarious rage

HE WAS best known as the star of movies such as “The Right Stuff” and TV shows such as “Bloodline”, which is odd. To say that Sam Shepard was a fine actor is like saying that Salman Rushdie wrote snappy advertising slogans or that Adam Smith was a pretty good …

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A new film-rating system considers depictions of gender roles

FILM-RATING systems have long been hopelessly subjective. Simply consider “I know it when I see it”, the statement made in 1964 by Potter Stewart, a Supreme Court justice, when ruling on an obscenity case. The situation hasn’t improved in the decades since. Both the Motion Picture Association of America and …

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The vanity and eerie beauty of early photography

, a copious exhibition of more than 300 early photographs at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, captures a moment when this now-quotidian technology was exotic and strange; a…Continue reading Powered by WPeMatico

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Epitaphs from the Great War find new life on Twitter

EVERY DAY at 5.30pm, an epitaph from the grave of a Commonwealth soldier or nurse killed during the Great War is posted on Twitter. They vary from the emotive (“Brave, upright, sincere, kind, a loved son, a widowed mother’s pride”), to the patriotic (“Surrendered self to duty, to his old …

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A new film sheds light on New York’s Hasidic community

A GREAT film can also double as a work of history, philosophy, or sociology, but it is perhaps at its most vital when serving as anthropology. Because of its immersive capabilities, film can expose broad audiences to unknown worlds. Sometimes these worlds are hidden among us. “Menashe” is such a …

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