How the world changed around Sergio Aragones and Mad magazine

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THE world in 2017 is a confusing place. It is often difficult to tell whether a news story is genuine, fake or an advertisement. Hollywood studios churn out repetitive superhero franchises with sequels veering dangerously close to double digits. Politicians, entertainers and media professionals across the spectrum are being exposed as hypocritical sex fiends. It is almost as if somebody pulled the curtain back and exposed the world for the farce it really is. 

This world will be familiar to anybody who has read Mad, a satirical comic magazine published since 1952 by a stable of writers, cartoonists and satirists credited as “the usual gang of idiots”. In Mad’s view of the world the news is never the same as the truth, movies are cynical, creatively bankrupt enterprises and men always have sex on their minds. Its brand of humour influenced a generation of American comics and writers. 

Yet for a magazine that predates “The Daily Show”, the Onion and “The Simpsons”, its…Continue reading

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