Many writers try to span America’s political divide

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THAT left- and right-leaning Americans read different books might be the least surprising fact about publishing. After all, they live in different places, eat different food, listen to different music and, of course, consume different kinds of news. All these reinforce one another; increasingly, progressives and conservatives simply do not know each other. And an analysis of book sales on Amazon, done for The Economist by Valdis Krebs, a data scientist specialising in network analysis and visualisation, bears that out graphically (see chart). People who buy conservative books buy only conservative books, as a rule, and the same is true on the left. Our data is taken from Amazon’s “Customers who bought…also bought…” feature.

Two liberal tomes are dominating the New York Times non-fiction bestseller list….Continue reading

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